Geek Freely: configuration

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    The whole point in this post is to run your own VPN service, and allow you to connect remote devices to your home network.

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    Showing posts with label configuration.

    Showing posts with label configuration.

    The Hardware

    After approximately 10 years of using XBMC, the old name for Kodi, I have tried a variety of hardware end-points.

    Always searching for the best bang for my buck. My conclusion is the Chromebox, I have a single

    and I am considering replacing my Pi’s with two more Chromeboxes. Raspberry Pi’s are nice and all, but they just don’t have the grunt, you are constantly modifying settings and over-clocking. The Asus Chromebox is a no hassle Kodi player.

    It’s silent, powerful, and it comes at the great price ~$160.

    Now I know a lot of people will be saying the Pi is cheaper, but let’s be honest – you need to spend at least $95. For that you get, the

    (~$45),

    (~$10),

    (~$10),

    (~$15) – and that doesn’t even include cables or a power supply, because you may have it lying around.

    The only question about the Chromebox is to consider which version. Some will , and some will give you , and of course some will give you both.  I have a basic , but am tempted by the

    for the AC network adapter.  provided some insightful comments on the Chromebox support of 4k and Wireless AC. AC network support can be gained in the cheaper Asus box with the , and there appears to be no difference in 4k support between models, however I had previously read the i5 would be required for 4k.

    Update: Some other readers noticed hardware omissions, I’d love to hear feedback on other hardware users have had success with, but a comparison always helps.  Here are a few I would love some more performance comparisons on:

    The Software

    There are a bunch of approaches, with the only real restriction being the hardware your running it on. I have tried the following:

    If you have ever read any of my , it will be no surprise that OpenELEC is the clear winner for me.

    The Remote

    For me this was a simple decision, nothing fancy here – I have tried a variety of solutions.

    At this time I am using the USB receiver from a

    and USB IR receiver I purchased for my initial XBMC HTPC, I have programmed my to send MCE commands – and that’s it. You could also use and have IR commands converted to keyboard commands – which gives you a lot of flexibility (I used to have a remote button programmed to send “w”, to update watched status quickly.)

    Update: One attentive reader, , noted the omission of . Utilizing the CEC adapter leverages your current TV remote to take care of the basic HTPC functionality. I personally find I want a few more buttons, but if you need the basics this is certainly worth investigating.

    The Installation and Configuration

    So you have your hardware and software, all you need to do now is install the software and you are ready to enjoy your music and home movies!

    I created a

    some time ago based on several different sources, but  has an

    that is a much better resource than my dated post.

    provides a simple installation script for running, after you have prepared the hardware, and the guide also recommends settings and covers some known issues.

    The Extras

    Personally, since I run three of these boxes in my house I like to have a synchronized library, providing watched/un-watched/resume status throughout the house. . Kodi is certainly moving towards a shared library implementation using UPNP – but I’m not sure it is quite there yet.

    Firstly, I have to say I cannot take all the credit for this… I got a lot of information from , who in turn got it from NAS4Free wiki.

    However, I did find some problems along the way, and as usual I want to keep it somewhere I can get easy access to in future – this blog.  Please also note, this will solve any m4a and flac transcoding issues, and possibly other codecs.

    The whole process relies on you setting up a jail in NAS4Free so that the changes are not lost on reboot (since this is an embedded guide).

    Lets start of with configuring NAS4Free to complete this task:

    SSH into your NAS4Free box using putty or similar. NOTE: Change all reference to /mnt/data to the mountpoint on your NAS where you are going to store the jail.

    The base system has to be downloaded to make sure you get all

    the necessary binaries, config files and scripts. To download it you can

    just copy paste the following commands into the ssh shell.

    The last command for fetching lib32 is not needed if you are running NAS4Free on an 32bit system.  The following two commands extract the base system into the proto folder inside the jail.

    NOTE: Obviously exchange EST for

    your own time=zone. Next we will configure the mounts that the jail is

    going to be able to access.

    NOTE: Change DataDisk1 for the mounts that you have on the NAS

    that you want to be accessible in the jail.

    Copy into the fstab file the following lines:

    /mnt/data/DataDisk1 /jail/proto/mnt/DataDisk1 nullfs rw 0 0

    The drive is mounted read write for playlist, comments, ratings, podcast access from Subsonic.

    The next part of the

    configuration is to create the rc.conf file.

    Copy into the rc.conf.local the following lines:

    jail_enable=”YES” # enable jails YES|NO

    jail_list=”proto” # name of the jails to start “proto www…”

    jail_proto_rootdir=”/jail/proto” # path to our jail

    jail_proto_hostname=”proto” # hostname

    jail_proto_ip=”192.168.0.30″ # ip of the jail, replace with a ip in the same subsystem as your NAS

    jail_proto_interface=”re0″ # Network Interface to use, replace with your NAS interface name

    jail_proto_devfs_enable=”YES” # use devfs

    jail_proto_mount_enable=”YES” # mount YES|NO

    jail_proto_fstab=”/jail/conf/fstab.proto” # File with Filesystems to mount

    Copy into jail_start the following lines:

    #!/bin/tcsh -x

    #mounting to /jail

    mkdir /jail

    mount_nullfs /mnt/data/jail /jail

    # copy jail binaries to /usr, not needed if N4F is 454 or up

    # because Daoyama include needed files, uncomment if you use low .454 version

    # cp -r /jail/conf/root/ /

    # link config files to /etc

    ln -s /jail/conf/rc.conf.local /etc

    #start all jails

    /etc/rc.d/jail start

    Make the start-up script executable with the following command:

    And to make it run each time the NAS server is started, add the following via the webgui under System|Advanced|Command Scripts.

    Command: /mnt/data/jail/conf/jail_start

    Type: PostInit

    Save and apply, and reboot your server. After a successful reboot check your new jail via SSH using the jls command, you should see something like this:

    JID             IP Address                   Hostname                      Path

    1                192.168.1.201             proto                              /jail/proto

    And that’s how you setup a FreeBSD jail on NAS4Free embedded.

    Enter the jail with the following command (based on the output of example jls above we use 1):

    The pkg_add command doesn’t function

    properly inside the jail. To fix this you have to run the following

    command NOTE: I am using a 64-bit install:

    Now start installing the packages required by

    Subsonic:

    Now install libmp3lame so that ffmpeg can use it for transcoding:

    Now compile and install your own ffmpeg with libmp3lame enabled, (remember –enable-libmp3lame during make config):

    Create the folders and download/extract subsonic standalone.

    Enter the following

    command while you are still inside the jail to see if subsonic starts.

    If subsonic started as it should you can connect to it via the

    browser at the following adress: Jail-IP:4040, default username is

    admin, and password admin.

    To make it run each time the NAS server is started add via the webgui under: System|Advanced|Command Scripts.

    Command: jexec 1 /var/subsonic/standalone/subsonic.sh

    Type: PostInit

    Save and apply, and reboot your server. After a successful reboot you can check your Subsonic install via http://Jail-IP:4040

    If your Subsonic installation has problems with the audio (the java

    install couldn’t see your audio dev) install

    alsa-plugins via the following command:

    ENJOY!

    And if you want to access your new service on your android device, why not try out the official

    (4/17/2013 Updated for Subsonic 4.8)

    (5/10/2013 Updated based on fsbruva’s comments http://forums.nas4free.org/viewtopic.php?f=79&t=3166&p=19759#p19759)

    It’s pretty good.  But I am not sure it is any better than my Netgear WNR3500L running DD-WRT, my wireless range isn’t any better.  I guess the best thing about it is the daul band wireless, I find I get higher wireless speeds.

    I set the base station up using only my iPhone.  The software for desktop is only available for Windows or Mac.  The Windows version requires Windows 7 SP1.

    So, for the longest time I tried to get

    working with iPhone and my home server (my problem was I was trying to use FTPS, instead of SFTP).  Using FileZilla I could always successfully connect using “require explicit FTP over TLS”:

    Based on this I figured it was an issue with the iPhone apps, I think it was error 425 (cannot build data connections).  Then I thought it was my , since I used , I figured maybe something was screwy – a draw back of bleeding edge geeky stuff, you question it.  Anyway, it was a port configuration issue by me.

    I needed to open port 22, not 21.  I also had to connect using different settings SFTP.

    As for iPhone client, I have tried a few; FTPOnTheGo, Files Connect, and Easy FTP.  Of them all I like FTPOnTheGo – I should probably look into the options again – considering iPad clients too.

    Since I originally stater this investigation and setup, I treated myself to a new router .  I might write a quick review on it actually…

    Previously on FreeNAS 0.7.2 I had to use the following configuration

    to get additional speed on my transfers, and those benefits were only

    when copying to the NAS, not from it.

    Everything was acceptable on FreeNAS 0.7.2, however updates had

    halted, FreeNAS took a leap to version 0.7.5, which there is no official

    upgrade route from 0.7.2, then 0.7.5 seems to have branched off into

    NAS4Free.

    So what to do?

    I changed my FreeNAS 0.7.2 installation into an embedded install,

    then upgraded to 0.7.5.  At this point I had to re-mount all my drives

    (backup configurations at every stage).  I was able to check the

    permissions I had configured by checking my old configuration_###.xml

    files.  Within minutes I had FreeNAS 0.7.5 running, additional benefits

    were already there – however the plan was to move to NAS4Free since I

    see FreeNAS support halting completely in the future.

    Upgrading to NAS4Free, while experimental, was the simplest process:

    Make a backup of your configuration. (Web GUI ‘System|Backup/Restore’)

    Modify the configuration by changing the upper most

    and the most lowest string

    on the configuration to

    and

    respectively.

    Change the version to 1.0.

    Burn the Live CD (ISO) and install NAS4Free.

    Restart the server without the CDROM.

    Import your modified configuration (Web GUI ‘System|Backup/Restore’) and restore.

    At this point I was able to remove all the extra auxiliary parameters for SAMBA.

    Update:  NAS4Free has an upgrade path from FreeNAS now.

    Notes can be found at the following location:

    This version supports upgrading from FreeNAS 0.7.2 or 0.7.5.

    The supported lowest config version is 8.9. (0.7.2.5246)

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