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    The whole point in this post is to run your own VPN service, and allow you to connect remote devices to your home network.

    To start off yo…

    Showing posts with label server.

    Showing posts with label server.

    , but it is hard to coordinate when they will all get online – so I decided to look into my options for notifications. In the end I went with Notify My Android (NMA). The NMA website provides a complete script for sending notifications via the Raspbian shell. The script can be found at the following location, I used the shell script, but there are other options – this guide focuses on the shell script:

    First thing we are going to do is log into our Raspbian system and let’s make sure timezone is configured correctly:

    Now let’s download the notification script from NMA to your Raspberry Pi Minecraft server:

    We need to do a couple of things with this file, first we need to make a change so that our NMA API key is in the file, using the following command:

    Edit APIKey= to use your API Key, you can find your own API Key from the NMA site.

    Now we have to make the shell script executable:

    At this point we have a shell script that allows us to send notifications from Raspbian to NMA servers, and then to your Android. The next step is to create a short Perl file to monitor the Nukkit server.log (or any other log file for that matter). This script looks at the entire file, not just the tail, so if you run it against an existing server you are going to get a few notifications when first run. I called my file notify.pl:

    Enter the following into the notify.pl Perl script:

    Much like the NMA script we have to make our Perl script executable:

    That’s it! Now you are going to have to

    so edit crontab:

    Enter the following at the end of your file:

    The sleep is required to make sure the server has the log file available (didn’t work for me without the sleep, I can only assume as the file is deleted on startup):

    Reboot your server and you are good to go!

    The whole point in this post is to run your own VPN service, and allow you to connect remote devices to your home network.

    To start off you need to choose a server that is going to be always available, or at least you should try to do that. Next thing is to install OpenVPN on the server and configure it, this can be done in no time at all with the help of the following site:

    The first command you are going to need to do is as follows:

    This downloads and executes the installation script, I had to run this as sudo, so:

    This script will take you through a variety of questions where you are prompted for entry, in most cases the default option will be appropriate and filled – however if you are running behind a firewall (which you probably will be, I’d like to point out a couple of gotchas).

    The IP address of the local machine should indeed be the local IP, there are other sites that suggest this should be the WAN IP of the server, that’s fine if the server has direct access to the internet – which mine does not, since it is behind the firewall I choose the local IP so it configures the correct interface to be monitoring.

    Next major question is configuring your external IP if you are behind a NAT, honestly you should be using a FQDN and not an IP – check out my previous post on dynu.com options []

    Once you are finished answering the questions you are ready to make client profiles, run the installer again and you will be prompted a variety of options, you are going to want to add a user:

    1) Add a new user

    2) Revoke an existing user

    3) Remove OpenVPN

    4) Exit

    Now that you have OpenVPN server installed in Ubuntu, and a client profile created for your device – all you have to do is setup any port forwarding required to the OpenVPN server.

    So in my case I setup a rule to forward all 1178 (1194 if you followed the default options) UDP VPN requests from my external IP address to the local IP address of the server running OpenVPN. This was done at my cable modem/router.

    That’s it, you’re done. Let me know if you have any questions or comments below – feel free to donate/tip the creator of the script on the following site:

    First of all, download the appropriate file for your operating system, https://plex.tv/downloads. For me I am using 64-bit.

    In a command line I type:

    wget https://downloads.plex.tv/plex-media-server/0.9.12.1.1079-b655370/plexmediaserver_0.9.12.1.1079-b655370_amd64.deb

    This downloads the file to my server, from here I simply install the software:

    sudo dpkg -i plexmediaserver_0.9.12.1.1079-b655370_amd64.deb

    Once the install is finished, reboot.

    sudo reboot

    So the other month I bought a ton of new equipment for a new NAS box.  The question was, which NAS software to go for?  As ever it needed to be free, preferably open-source, and have all the functionality I was looking for.

    Webserver

    FTP server

    SAMBA/CIFS

    RSYNC

    I wrote about my excitment for

    more than a few months back ().  However during this wait my current NAS ) began to fail, due to harddrive issues, and the fact that it was a crappy old box.

    OMV has yet to be released, so I was in a bit of a pickle, I have new hardware, I need a new NAS, so I began to try my alternatives.  I installed and checked out the following NAS solutions:

    P.S. There are more, but some of them were ruled out due to hardware limitations, or pricing for several drive solutions ().

    eBox was nice in the fact that it had a built in LDAP server, but I soon realized that it is not something I really need.  Openfiler was cool, but I had some issues with my

    drives (a), and I wasn’t really a fan of the Volume Management. And Amahi… it sounds good, but the plug and play aspect is a little cluncky/cloogy in my mind.

    So in the end, I stuck with FreeNAS!  I have implemented encryption on my drives, FreeNAS handles the WD EARS no problem, setup the UPS feature for safe power downs.  All in all I am happy with my decision, there is no guarantee that OMV will be in a good shape when it is release, so why take the risk – stick with something I know and love!

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