Networks and CU-SeeMe

    Networks and CU-SeeMe

    Firewalls

    ……………………………………

    Networks and CU-SeeMe

    Question: My firewall blocks CU-SeeMe! Help!

    Answer: Firewalls are security screens erected by systems and network administrators to protect their users from unauthorized intrusions. A firewall can be configured to allow CU-SeeMe traffic through. A firewall screens out all traffic which it doesn’t know about, and that includes the CU-SeeMe audio and video streams. Your firewall administrator can add filtering rules that explain to a firewall what CU-SeeMe traffic “looks like” by describing the ports it uses. The following filtering rules will allow CU-SeeMe UDP traffic through your firewall. Your firewall may use a slightly different syntax, but your firewall administrator will know what to do.

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7648

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7649

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7650

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7651

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7652

    Replacing the xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx with the address of your computer will allow CU-SeeMe traffic only to and from your computer, everyone else on your network will be unable to use CU-SeeMe. Replacing it with a broadcast address will allow everyone on your network to use CU-SeeMe. The safest arrangement allows CU-SeeMe traffic to a computer that’s not connected to your remaining network, or one protected by a router that’s properly-configured to provide very tight network security.

    Question: What about ISDN?

    Answer: ISDN – Integrated Services Digital Network – provides a 56 to 128 kbps pipe into your home or office. Here are some web-based resources:

    Questions about CU-SeeMe?

    Ask the readers of the .

    Have you found errors nontrivial or marginal, factual, analytical and illogical, arithmetical, temporal, or even typographical? Please let me know; drop me . Thanks!

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    1993-2006 by ,

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    Networks and CU-SeeMe

    Networks and CU-SeeMe

    Firewalls

    ……………………………………

    Networks and CU-SeeMe

    Question: My firewall blocks CU-SeeMe! Help!

    Answer: Firewalls are security screens erected by systems and network administrators to protect their users from unauthorized intrusions. A firewall can be configured to allow CU-SeeMe traffic through. A firewall screens out all traffic which it doesn’t know about, and that includes the CU-SeeMe audio and video streams. Your firewall administrator can add filtering rules that explain to a firewall what CU-SeeMe traffic “looks like” by describing the ports it uses. The following filtering rules will allow CU-SeeMe UDP traffic through your firewall. Your firewall may use a slightly different syntax, but your firewall administrator will know what to do.

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7648

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7649

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7650

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7651

    permit udp 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 0.0.0.0 eq 7652

    Replacing the xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx with the address of your computer will allow CU-SeeMe traffic only to and from your computer, everyone else on your network will be unable to use CU-SeeMe. Replacing it with a broadcast address will allow everyone on your network to use CU-SeeMe. The safest arrangement allows CU-SeeMe traffic to a computer that’s not connected to your remaining network, or one protected by a router that’s properly-configured to provide very tight network security.

    Question: What about ISDN?

    Answer: ISDN – Integrated Services Digital Network – provides a 56 to 128 kbps pipe into your home or office. Here are some web-based resources:

    Questions about CU-SeeMe?

    Ask the readers of the .

    Have you found errors nontrivial or marginal, factual, analytical and illogical, arithmetical, temporal, or even typographical? Please let me know; drop me . Thanks!

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    This page

    is

    1993-2006 by ,

    via the Creative Commons License. Questions and comments? Send

    to the Geek Times Webmaster. (Domain and web content hosting at .)

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.