Mac OS X: Using Qualcomm qpopper to provide Post Office Protocol (POP) access for email users

    Mac OS X: Using Qualcomm qpopper to provide Post Office Protocol (POP) access for email users

    .

    This page describes using Qualcomm qpopper to provide Post Office Protocol (POP) access for email users.

    This work is to be done on the computer which is to be your mail server. You may sit at that computer’s keyboard or work remotely.

    These UNIX commands have been taken directly from a Terminal window – these are the commands I use – rather than having been composed after the fact. This is *exactly* what worked for me. I’ve taken pains to choose forms of the commands which should make sense to you even if you’re new to UNIX.

    Get the software

    We connect to our mail server, create a local workspace, acquire the software, and decompress it.

    % ssh -l username server.geektimes.com

    server % curl -O

    server % gnutar xzf qpopper4.0.4.tar.gz

    Build and install the software

    A few simple steps and we’re done. Routine output elided; error messages left in for you to see, but these may safely be ignored.

    server % cd qpopper4.0.4

    server % ./configure

    server % make

    [elided]

    ld: warning multiple definitions of symbol _mkstemp

    mktemp.o definition of _mkstemp in section (__TEXT,__text)

    /usr/lib/libSystem.dylib(mktemp.So) definition of _mkstemp

    ld: warning multiple definitions of symbol _mktemp

    mktemp.o definition of _mktemp in section (__TEXT,__text)

    /usr/lib/libSystem.dylib(mktemp.So) definition of _mktemp

    [elided]

    Now move the software to its final resting place and set up a soft link to span two slightly different visions of the mail hierarchy.

    server % sudo cp ./popper/popper /usr/libexec/

    server % sudo ln -s /var/mail /var/spool/mail

    server % ls -l /var/mail /var/spool/mail

    lrwxr-xr-x

    1 root

    wheel

    9 Sep 28 00:05 /var/spool/mail@ -> /var/mail

    Edit the configuration file and start things going

    The /etc/inetd.conf file contains the configuration info used by Mac OS X to provide services. We’ll have to specify how to spread some Post Office Protocol cheer around to your users. We’ll make a backup copy of that file, edit the file (I used vi, but you can use your favorites) and change the existing pop3 line so that it points to our newly-built qpopper.

    server % sudo cp /etc/inetd.conf /etc/inetd.conf.orig

    server % sudo vi /etc/inetd.conf

    #pop3

    stream

    tcp

    nowait

    root

    /usr/libexec/tcpd

    /usr/local/libexec/popper

    pop3

    stream

    tcp

    nowait

    root

    /usr/libexec/tcpd

    /usr/libexec/popper qpopper -s

    Once the file is saved we find the process identifier (PID) of the inetd daemon and we send it the hang-up (hup) signal to have it re-process its configuration file.

    server % ps -auxc | grep inetd

    root

    335

    0.0

    0.0

    1308

    116

    ??

    Ss

    2:27AM

    0:00.00 inetd

    server % sudo kill -hup 335

    Testing to ensure things are working

    Presuming that you’ve already got

    properly configured you can test your sendmail / qpopper installation by using your favorite email client (or a ) to send an email message to a user on that machine.

    Then use telnet again to check the mail queue for that user, as in this example:

    server % telnet localhost pop3

    Trying ::1…

    telnet: connect to address ::1: Connection refused

    Trying 127.0.0.1…

    Connected to localhost.

    Escape character is ‘^]’.

    +OK Qpopper (version 4.0.4) at server.geektimes.com starting.

    user username

    +OK Password required for username.

    pass password

    +OK username has 1 visible message (0 hidden) in 468 octets.

    list

    1 468

    .

    quit

    +OK Pop server at server.geektimes.com signing off.

    Connection closed by foreign host.

    server %

    Clean up after yourself

    Let’s remove the install directory now that we’re done.

    % cd ~

    % rm -rf ./install

    You might want to – okay, you really ought to – jump up one level, to see how this fits into the

    of deploying a mail server.

    This page

    is

    1993-2006 by ,

    via the Creative Commons License. Questions and comments? Send

    to the Geek Times Webmaster. (Domain and web content hosting at .)

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.