Utilikilt review

    Utilikilt review

    Utilikilt review

    ……………………………………

    Utilikilt review

    The

    is a modern interpretation of the classic Scottish vesture. Comfortable, as no bifurcated pants could possible be, this modern kilt is functional, stylish, modest, and sturdy. Here’s my review of this interesting garment.

    Made with a pleat pattern that doesn’t lend itself to use with tartans (the horizontal lines won’t line up), the Utilikilt is offered in solid colors and irregular patterns. The Workman’s uses a heavyweight duck; other styles are a bit lighter.

    The Utilikilt is properly worn on the hips, not held in place by the tension of a belt. It’s donned by wrapping it around oneself and snapping the ends left-over-right in the front. One could also undo one or two snaps and pull it up like a pant. In addition to the security of the heavy-duty snaps, a belt travelling through the goodly number of belt loops will secure the ends together. (I guess you could go and add a suspender 🙂

    Cargo pants are a favorite of mine, and the Utilikilt gives them a run for the money. Two ample pockets on the rear are sufficient for most uses, but the two large cargo pockets, one on each side, dramatically increase the carrying capacity of the garment. The latter are divided with stitching so you can properly store tools. There’s a hammer loop which’ll hold a full-size drill.

    Generally, I’d say the Utilikilt has sort of a Roman look. (My

    first reaction was “Sparticus!”) The best part are the sewn-in pleats, which hold up much better than ironed-in pleats. (I’m still experimenting with spray starch, dry cleaning, and leaving it au natural from the washing machine, after drying it by laying it flat upon the drier.)

    And, as you can see, it’s not a mini-skirt. Nothing to worry about when one bends over. In fact, it’s pretty easy to keep the family jewels properly stowed in most positions, although I’d recommend against doing cartwheels. Nothing to see here, folks. Move along.

    Have you found errors nontrivial or marginal, factual, analytical and illogical, arithmetical, temporal, or even typographical? Please let me know; drop me . Thanks!

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    Utilikilt review

    Utilikilt review

    Utilikilt review

    ……………………………………

    Utilikilt review

    The

    is a modern interpretation of the classic Scottish vesture. Comfortable, as no bifurcated pants could possible be, this modern kilt is functional, stylish, modest, and sturdy. Here’s my review of this interesting garment.

    Made with a pleat pattern that doesn’t lend itself to use with tartans (the horizontal lines won’t line up), the Utilikilt is offered in solid colors and irregular patterns. The Workman’s uses a heavyweight duck; other styles are a bit lighter.

    The Utilikilt is properly worn on the hips, not held in place by the tension of a belt. It’s donned by wrapping it around oneself and snapping the ends left-over-right in the front. One could also undo one or two snaps and pull it up like a pant. In addition to the security of the heavy-duty snaps, a belt travelling through the goodly number of belt loops will secure the ends together. (I guess you could go and add a suspender 🙂

    Cargo pants are a favorite of mine, and the Utilikilt gives them a run for the money. Two ample pockets on the rear are sufficient for most uses, but the two large cargo pockets, one on each side, dramatically increase the carrying capacity of the garment. The latter are divided with stitching so you can properly store tools. There’s a hammer loop which’ll hold a full-size drill.

    Generally, I’d say the Utilikilt has sort of a Roman look. (My

    first reaction was “Sparticus!”) The best part are the sewn-in pleats, which hold up much better than ironed-in pleats. (I’m still experimenting with spray starch, dry cleaning, and leaving it au natural from the washing machine, after drying it by laying it flat upon the drier.)

    And, as you can see, it’s not a mini-skirt. Nothing to worry about when one bends over. In fact, it’s pretty easy to keep the family jewels properly stowed in most positions, although I’d recommend against doing cartwheels. Nothing to see here, folks. Move along.

    Have you found errors nontrivial or marginal, factual, analytical and illogical, arithmetical, temporal, or even typographical? Please let me know; drop me . Thanks!

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    This page

    is

    1993-2006 by ,

    via the Creative Commons License. Questions and comments? Send

    to the Geek Times Webmaster. (Domain and web content hosting at .)

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.