How to Rip a DVD

    How to Rip a DVD

    DVDs finally give us movies in a high-quality digital format. For this I am very thankful.

    The Black Hole, Buena Vista

    DVDs have several drawbacks, as I’ve experienced them. They’re relatively fragile; a careless moment is all that’s necessary to damage the disc. Viewing them on my

    uses a lot more battery than viewing a video stored on the hard disk. They may be lost, especially when travelling.

    “Ripping a DVD” is the term of art for converting the large, high-quality, on-DVD video into a version that’s much smaller, lower-quality, on a hard disk (or burned back to a CD or DVD). Watching a DVD in another place (“space-shifting”) and at a later date (“time-shifting”) has made long plane flights with children into a calm(er) experience.

    (An added benefit is that the original DVDs may be stored safely away from the eager hands of my rough-and-tumble offspring.)

    Ripping a DVD

    The overview above was actually simplified. Ripping a DVD entails taking the data from the DVD and converting it into an equally large version but which has been stripped of anti-copying and geographic viewing restrictions. Encoding this data into a smaller movie will be covered later on.

    There’s a plethora of free software to rip DVDs, and not much to say about them. I use OSEx for ; find one you like and give it a try with your favorite DVD. Then read on.

    Encoding into a smaller movie

    I’ve found that you need to have two pieces of information in hand for each ripped dataset: movie length and aspect ratio. Both are most easily determined when you have the DVD in hand (and should be noted if you’re copying a DVD from the library for later viewing).

    The aspect ratio is not as obvious as the movie length 🙂 so I’ll briefly cover it here in pictures. There are other, less-used, aspect ratios (such as 1.66:1 and 2.20:1 (70mm)) but making mention is all I’ll do with them.

    The Wizard of Oz (1939, Warner)

    The English Patient (1996, Miramax)

    The Thin Red Line (1998, Fox)

    Widescreen anamorphic1.85:1-

    Widescreen TV1.78:116:9

    Full Screen (Standard TV)1.33:14:3

    Have you found errors nontrivial or marginal, factual, analytical and illogical, arithmetical, temporal, or even typographical? Please

    . Thanks!

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    Leave a Reply

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    How to Rip a DVD

    How to Rip a DVD

    DVDs finally give us movies in a high-quality digital format. For this I am very thankful.

    The Black Hole, Buena Vista

    DVDs have several drawbacks, as I’ve experienced them. They’re relatively fragile; a careless moment is all that’s necessary to damage the disc. Viewing them on my

    uses a lot more battery than viewing a video stored on the hard disk. They may be lost, especially when travelling.

    “Ripping a DVD” is the term of art for converting the large, high-quality, on-DVD video into a version that’s much smaller, lower-quality, on a hard disk (or burned back to a CD or DVD). Watching a DVD in another place (“space-shifting”) and at a later date (“time-shifting”) has made long plane flights with children into a calm(er) experience.

    (An added benefit is that the original DVDs may be stored safely away from the eager hands of my rough-and-tumble offspring.)

    Ripping a DVD

    The overview above was actually simplified. Ripping a DVD entails taking the data from the DVD and converting it into an equally large version but which has been stripped of anti-copying and geographic viewing restrictions. Encoding this data into a smaller movie will be covered later on.

    There’s a plethora of free software to rip DVDs, and not much to say about them. I use OSEx for ; find one you like and give it a try with your favorite DVD. Then read on.

    Encoding into a smaller movie

    I’ve found that you need to have two pieces of information in hand for each ripped dataset: movie length and aspect ratio. Both are most easily determined when you have the DVD in hand (and should be noted if you’re copying a DVD from the library for later viewing).

    The aspect ratio is not as obvious as the movie length 🙂 so I’ll briefly cover it here in pictures. There are other, less-used, aspect ratios (such as 1.66:1 and 2.20:1 (70mm)) but making mention is all I’ll do with them.

    The Wizard of Oz (1939, Warner)

    The English Patient (1996, Miramax)

    The Thin Red Line (1998, Fox)

    Widescreen anamorphic1.85:1-

    Widescreen TV1.78:116:9

    Full Screen (Standard TV)1.33:14:3

    Have you found errors nontrivial or marginal, factual, analytical and illogical, arithmetical, temporal, or even typographical? Please

    . Thanks!

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    This page, http://www.GeekTimes.com/michael/techno/computing/software/dvd/rip.html, is

    1993-2004 by , all rights reserved.

    Questions and comments? Send

    to the Geek Times Webmaster.

    Web space graciously donated by , an Internet Service Provider in .

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.