Mac OS X: rsync install

    Mac OS X: rsync install

    .

    Keeping incremental backups on another UNIX box using rsync30 May 2001

    One of my backup startegies is to push my development directories to another UNIX box on the client’s local area network, where others have access to it when my

    is with me. Here’s how to install and configure rsync to do just this.

    This page describes the installation, configuration, and use of the rsync file synchronization tool, which I use to keep a backup of my development directories on another computer (typically on the test box, where others have access to it when my

    is not connected to the client’s local area network).

    Rather than describing what you’re doing, I’ll show you exactly what to do. You’ll do the work of acquiring and installing software from within the Terminal application, using a web browser only for the testing steps.

    I assure you that the UNIX commands I’ll direct you to invoke have been taken directly from a Terminal window – these are the commands I just used to do a clean install – rather than having been composed after the fact. This is *exactly* what worked for me. I’ve taken pains to choose forms of the commands which should make sense to you even if you’re new to UNIX.

    Get the software

    We create a local workspace, acquire the software, and decompress it.

    % mkdir ~/install ; cd ~/install

    % wget http://rsync.samba.org/ftp/rsync/rsync-2.4.6.tar.gz

    % gnutar zxf rsync-2.4.6.tar.gz

    % cd rsync-2.4.6

    Build the software

    Because the Mac OS X system type is new it isn’t understood by older versions of configure. So we copy the master config preferences to our local directory to give it a hint. Then we build the software and move it to the canonical location, saving the older version which shipped with Mac OS X. We also copy over the man page, saving the older version.

    % cp /usr/libexec/config.* .

    % configure

    loading cache ./config.cache

    checking host system type… powerpc-apple-darwin1.3.3

    checking target system type… powerpc-apple-darwin1.3.3

    checking build system type… powerpc-apple-darwin1.3.3

    [elided]

    % make

    [elided]

    % sudo mv /usr/bin/rsync /usr/bin/rsync-2.3.1-old

    % sudo mv ./rsync /usr/bin

    % sudo mv /usr/share/man/man1/rsync.1 /usr/share/man/man1/rsync-2.3.1-old.1

    % sudo mv rsync.1 /usr/share/man/man1

    Deploy the software

    I follow the same steps on my Sun box (less the copying of /usr/libexec/config.*). Then I start pushing my file tree to that box:

    WARNING, WARNING: DANGER WILL ROBINSON! Ummm, the Sun box a client has provided is woefully lacking on the tools I need. So I’ll have to detour and do some basic systems administration and tool-building before I can finish this entry. Apologies.

    –verbose –checksum –recursive –times –progress

    –dry-run

    Clean up after yourself

    Let’s remove the install directory now that we’re done.

    % cd ~

    % rm -rf ./install

    You might want to – okay, you really ought to – jump up one level, to see how this fits into the

    of developing and deploying web-based applications (and to see what other tools I’ve installed to work with this one).

    This page

    is

    1993-2006 by ,

    via the Creative Commons License. Questions and comments? Send

    to the Geek Times Webmaster. (Domain and web content hosting at .)

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.

    Mac OS X: rsync install

    Mac OS X: rsync install

    .

    Keeping incremental backups on another UNIX box using rsync30 May 2001

    One of my backup startegies is to push my development directories to another UNIX box on the client’s local area network, where others have access to it when my

    is with me. Here’s how to install and configure rsync to do just this.

    This page describes the installation, configuration, and use of the rsync file synchronization tool, which I use to keep a backup of my development directories on another computer (typically on the test box, where others have access to it when my

    is not connected to the client’s local area network).

    Rather than describing what you’re doing, I’ll show you exactly what to do. You’ll do the work of acquiring and installing software from within the Terminal application, using a web browser only for the testing steps.

    I assure you that the UNIX commands I’ll direct you to invoke have been taken directly from a Terminal window – these are the commands I just used to do a clean install – rather than having been composed after the fact. This is *exactly* what worked for me. I’ve taken pains to choose forms of the commands which should make sense to you even if you’re new to UNIX.

    Get the software

    We create a local workspace, acquire the software, and decompress it.

    % mkdir ~/install ; cd ~/install

    % wget http://rsync.samba.org/ftp/rsync/rsync-2.4.6.tar.gz

    % gnutar zxf rsync-2.4.6.tar.gz

    % cd rsync-2.4.6

    Build the software

    Because the Mac OS X system type is new it isn’t understood by older versions of configure. So we copy the master config preferences to our local directory to give it a hint. Then we build the software and move it to the canonical location, saving the older version which shipped with Mac OS X. We also copy over the man page, saving the older version.

    % cp /usr/libexec/config.* .

    % configure

    loading cache ./config.cache

    checking host system type… powerpc-apple-darwin1.3.3

    checking target system type… powerpc-apple-darwin1.3.3

    checking build system type… powerpc-apple-darwin1.3.3

    [elided]

    % make

    [elided]

    % sudo mv /usr/bin/rsync /usr/bin/rsync-2.3.1-old

    % sudo mv ./rsync /usr/bin

    % sudo mv /usr/share/man/man1/rsync.1 /usr/share/man/man1/rsync-2.3.1-old.1

    % sudo mv rsync.1 /usr/share/man/man1

    Deploy the software

    I follow the same steps on my Sun box (less the copying of /usr/libexec/config.*). Then I start pushing my file tree to that box:

    WARNING, WARNING: DANGER WILL ROBINSON! Ummm, the Sun box a client has provided is woefully lacking on the tools I need. So I’ll have to detour and do some basic systems administration and tool-building before I can finish this entry. Apologies.

    –verbose –checksum –recursive –times –progress

    –dry-run

    Clean up after yourself

    Let’s remove the install directory now that we’re done.

    % cd ~

    % rm -rf ./install

    You might want to – okay, you really ought to – jump up one level, to see how this fits into the

    of developing and deploying web-based applications (and to see what other tools I’ve installed to work with this one).

    This page

    is

    1993-2006 by ,

    via the Creative Commons License. Questions and comments? Send

    to the Geek Times Webmaster. (Domain and web content hosting at .)

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.