Mac OS X: ssh key generation and deployment

    Mac OS X: ssh key generation and deployment

    .

    ssh key generation and deployment10 March 2005

    Many times in the UN*X world one needs to connect to a remote machine via a command-line interface. The secure shell (ssh) is the preferred way of doing this.

    This page describes the generation and deployment of ssh keys. Rather than describing what you’re doing, I’ll show you exactly what to do. You’ll do the work of acquiring and installing software from within the Terminal application, using a web browser only for the testing steps.

    I assure you that the UNIX commands I’ll direct you to invoke have been taken directly from a Terminal window – these are the commands I just used to do a clean install – rather than having been composed after the fact. This is *exactly* what worked for me. I’ve taken pains to choose forms of the commands which should make sense to you even if you’re new to UNIX.

    DSA key generation for ssh protocol version 2

    I’m going to skip over the RSA key generation for version 1, as it’s not often used anymore.

    % ssh-keygen -t dsa

    Generating public/private dsa key pair.

    Enter file in which to save the key (/Users/mickey/.ssh/id_dsa):

    Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase): my#d0g has_fl3a5

    Enter same passphrase again: my#d0g has_fl3a5

    Your identification has been saved in /Users/mickey/.ssh/id_dsa.

    Your public key has been saved in /Users/mickey/.ssh/id_dsa.pub.

    The key fingerprint is:

    ff:ff:ff:12:2b:c3:7e:91:27:74:d8:ff:11:24:ff:5f

    %

    The keys having been generated, I’m now going to prepare a destination on the remote computer:

    % ssh remote

    Password:

    LDAP Password:

    remote % mkdir ~/.ssh

    remote % ^D  That’s a Control-D

    Connection to remote closed.

    %

    Then, back on my local machine, I copy the generated public key over to the remote machine:

    % scp ~/.ssh/id_dsa.pub /

    Password:

    LDAP Password:

    id_dsa.pub

    100%

    609

    406.5KB/s

    00:00

    %

    Once again, I go to the remote machine and copy the public key into the authorized_keys2 file:

    % ssh remote

    Password:

    LDAP Password:

    remote % cd .ssh

    remote % cat id_dsa.pub >> authorized_keys2

    remote % ^D

    Connection to remote closed.

    %

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    Mac OS X: ssh key generation and deployment

    Mac OS X: ssh key generation and deployment

    .

    ssh key generation and deployment10 March 2005

    Many times in the UN*X world one needs to connect to a remote machine via a command-line interface. The secure shell (ssh) is the preferred way of doing this.

    This page describes the generation and deployment of ssh keys. Rather than describing what you’re doing, I’ll show you exactly what to do. You’ll do the work of acquiring and installing software from within the Terminal application, using a web browser only for the testing steps.

    I assure you that the UNIX commands I’ll direct you to invoke have been taken directly from a Terminal window – these are the commands I just used to do a clean install – rather than having been composed after the fact. This is *exactly* what worked for me. I’ve taken pains to choose forms of the commands which should make sense to you even if you’re new to UNIX.

    DSA key generation for ssh protocol version 2

    I’m going to skip over the RSA key generation for version 1, as it’s not often used anymore.

    % ssh-keygen -t dsa

    Generating public/private dsa key pair.

    Enter file in which to save the key (/Users/mickey/.ssh/id_dsa):

    Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase): my#d0g has_fl3a5

    Enter same passphrase again: my#d0g has_fl3a5

    Your identification has been saved in /Users/mickey/.ssh/id_dsa.

    Your public key has been saved in /Users/mickey/.ssh/id_dsa.pub.

    The key fingerprint is:

    ff:ff:ff:12:2b:c3:7e:91:27:74:d8:ff:11:24:ff:5f

    %

    The keys having been generated, I’m now going to prepare a destination on the remote computer:

    % ssh remote

    Password:

    LDAP Password:

    remote % mkdir ~/.ssh

    remote % ^D  That’s a Control-D

    Connection to remote closed.

    %

    Then, back on my local machine, I copy the generated public key over to the remote machine:

    % scp ~/.ssh/id_dsa.pub /

    Password:

    LDAP Password:

    id_dsa.pub

    100%

    609

    406.5KB/s

    00:00

    %

    Once again, I go to the remote machine and copy the public key into the authorized_keys2 file:

    % ssh remote

    Password:

    LDAP Password:

    remote % cd .ssh

    remote % cat id_dsa.pub >> authorized_keys2

    remote % ^D

    Connection to remote closed.

    %

    This page

    is

    1993-2006 by ,

    via the Creative Commons License. Questions and comments? Send

    to the Geek Times Webmaster. (Domain and web content hosting at .)

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.